What to Read: April-May 2015

Each month multiple bloggers, researchers, and clinicians produce evidence-based content that moves our profession forward. Below are several research and blog articles I recommend from this past month…

Blog Posts:

1. “Stabbed in the back: Moving the knife out of back pain“, by Jørgen Jevne
2. “Don’t Freak Out: Treating Pain with Simple Fundamentals“, by Greg Lehman, BKin, MSc, DC, MScPT
3. “How do I minimize confirmation bias?“, by Harrison Vaughn, PT, DPT
4. “5 Easy Explanations for Common Treatments“, by Erson Religioso, DPT, FAAOMPT
5. “Kill All Pain“, by Adriaan Louw PT, PhD, CSMT
6. “The Bigger Picture“, by Kenny Venere, PT, DPT
7. “Does Movement Assessment Really Tell You Anything?“, Trent Nessler, PT, MPT, DPT
8. “Review of the Clinical Utility of Pain Classification, Part 1“, Niamh Moloney, PT
9. “Review of the Clinical Utility of Pain Classification, Part 2“, Niamh Moloney, PT
10. “New Era in Orthopedic Special Tests for the Shoulder“, Eric Hegedus, PT, DPT, MHSc, OCS, CSCS

Research:

1. Hug F, Hodges PW, Tucker K. Muscle Force Cannot Be Directly Inferred From Muscle Activation: Illustrated by the Proposed Imbalance of Force Between the Vastus Medialis and Vastus Lateralis in People With Patellofemoral Pain. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015;45(5):360–365. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5905.

2. Grooms D, Appelbaum G, Onate J. Neuroplasticity Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Framework for Visual-Motor Training Approaches in Rehabilitation. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015;45(5):381–393. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5549.

3. Lee D-R, Kim LJ. Reliability and validity of the closed kinetic chain upper extremity stability test. Journal of Physical Therapy Science. 2015;27(4):1071–1073.

4. Coronado RA, Bialosky JE, Bishop MD, et al. The Comparative Effects of Spinal and Peripheral Thrust Manipulation and Exercise on Pain Sensitivity and the Relation to Clinical Outcome: A Mechanistic Trial Using a Shoulder Pain Model. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015;45(4):252–264. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5745.

5. Beattie PF, Silfies SP. Improving Long-Term Outcomes for Chronic Low Back Pain: Time for a New Paradigm? Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015;45(4):236–239. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.0105.

6. Ramskov D, Barton C, Nielsen RO, Rasmussen S. High Eccentric Hip Abduction Strength Reduces the Risk of Developing Patellofemoral Pain Among Novice Runners Initiating a Self-Structured Running Program: A 1-Year Observational Study. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015;45(3):153–161. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5091.

7. Ardern CL, Taylor NF, Feller JA, Whitehead TS, Webster KE. Sports Participation 2 Years After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Athletes Who Had Not Returned to Sport at 1 Year: A Prospective Follow-up of Physical Function and Psychological Factors in 122 Athletes. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015;43(4):848–856. doi:10.1177/0363546514563282.

8. Weiler R, et al. Non-operative management of a complete anterior cruciate ligament injury in an English Premier League football player with return to play in less than 8 weeks: applying common sense in the absence of evidence. BMJ Case Reports 2015; doi:10.1136/bcr-2014-208012

9. Pappas E, et al. Do exercises used in injury prevention programmes modify cutting task biomechanics? A systematic review with meta-analysis. Br J Sports Med 2015;49:673-680 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-093796

10. Wilk KE, Macrina L, et al. Deficits in Glenohumeral Passive Range of Motion Increase Risk of Elbow Injury in Professional Baseball Pitchers: A Prospective Study. Am J Sports Med. 2015; 43(6)

What to Read: January 2015

Each month multiple bloggers, researchers, and clinicians produce evidence-based content that moves our profession forward. Below are several research and blog articles I recommend from this past month…

Blog Posts:

1. “Does Movement Impact Hip Pain“, by Trent Nessler, DPT

2. “Does Movement Impact Hip Pain – Part II“, by Trent Nessler, DPT

3. “Prone Pressup Progression/Regression for Loss of Sidegliding“, Erson Religioso, DPT, FAAOMPT

4. “Snap Crackle and Pop – Why does my knee click?“, by Claire Robertson, PT, MSc

5. “What is the Tissue Source in Low Back Pain?“, by Harrison Vaughn, DPT, OCS

Research:

1. Andernord D, et al. Patient Predictors of Early Revision Surgery After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Cohort Study of 16,930 Patients With 2-Year Follow-up. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015; 43(1): 121-127.

2. Driban JB, et al. Is Participation in Certain Sports Associated With Knee Osteoarthritis? A Systematic Review. Journal of Athletic Training. 2015. [Epub ahead of print]

3. Eggerding V, Meuffels DE, Bierma-Zeinstra SMA, Verhaar JA, Reijman M. Factors Related to the Need for Surgical Reconstruction After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015; 45(1): 37–44. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5183.

4. Goossens P, Keijsers E, van Geenen RJC, et al. Validity of the Thessaly Test in Evaluating Meniscal Tears Compared With Arthroscopy: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015; 45(1): 18–24. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5215.

5. Grant JA, et al. Ability of Preseason Body Composition and Physical Fitness to Predict the Risk of Injury in Male Collegiate Hockey Players. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. 2015; 7(1): 45-51.

6. Langevin P, Desmeules F, Lamothe M, Robitaille S, Roy J-S. Comparison of 2 Manual Therapy and Exercise Protocols for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Short-Term Effects. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 2015; 45(1): 4–17. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5211.

7. McVeigh F, et al. An Exploration of Sports Rehabilitators and Athletic Rehabilitation Therapists’ Views on Fear of Re-injury Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. 2015. [Epub ahead of print]

8. Myer GD, Ford KR, Di Stasi SL, Barber Foss KD, Mitchell LJ, Hewett TE. High knee abduction moments are common risk factors for patellofemoral pain (PFP) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in girls: Is PFP itself a predictor for subsequent ACL injury? British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015; 49: 118-122. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-092536

9. Smith CA, et al. Association of Y Balance Test Reach Asymmetry and Injury in Division I Athletes. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2015; 47(1): 136–141.

10. Taylor JB, Waxman JP, Richter SJ, Shultz SJ. Evaluation of the effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programme training components: a systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015; 49: 79-87. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-092358