What is the Key to the ACL Epidemic? Prevention.

In my previous post, I discussed the current research and concepts with regards to Return to Sport following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLR)... Now it is time to discuss how we, as clinicians, can help to prevent these injuries altogether. A recent Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of 14 studies and 27,000 participants conducted by Gagnier…

ACL Reconstruction: When Can I Play Again?

"When can I play ___________ again?" Such a simple question. Following an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), this is the answer that everyone (clinician, patient, coach, and parent) wants to know. Unfortunately, this simple question does not have a simple answer. With copious amounts of research devoted to this pathology, it would seem like an…

The Chondral Lesion: Aftermath of an ACL Rupture

According to Swenson et al, the third most common knee injury in high school aged athletes is pathology associated with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) at 25.4%. Additionally, Griffin et al estimated that the total number of ACL ruptures per year approaches nearly 250,000 and a subsequent surgical reconstrucaton is perfromed in nearly 125,000 patients…

Strength Training Considerations for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

In my previous post regarding Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), I delved into its etiological understanding. Now that we are beginning to learn more about this syndrome and its subsequent biomechanical considerations, we can begin to develop a more effective and targeted strength training program. Posterolateral Hip Musculature Last year, two systematic reviews were published that…

Etiology of PFPS: A Biomechanical Perspective

My last post regarding patellofemoral pain syndrome (VMO? VM-No) stated its prevalence and its misdirected treatment. This next post will help to clear up some of the confusion amongst clinicians as to the cause of PFPS, which should in turn help to drive the most effective treatment strategies. What causes patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)? Now,…

Invited Commentary: Rethinking Short Arc Quads

The following blog post was written by TJ Moore, SPT, ATC who is currently a 2nd year DPT student at the University of Pittsburgh. TJ graduated from Western Carolina University with a bachelor’s degree in Athletic Training in 2010. Following graduation, he obtained a job at Duke University as an Athletic Trainer and worked with…

VMO? VM-No.

According to a retrospective case-control analysis by Taunton et al, of the 2,002 running-related injuries seen at a primary care sports injury facility, 42.1% (842/2,002) were knee injuries. Of these knee injuries, 39.3% (331/842) were due to patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), which made PFPS far and away the most common diagnosis found in this large-scale…